Decision To Drop Atomic Bomb Essay

Decision To Drop Atomic Bomb Essay-34
In 2003, there were still 120,000 of these Purple Heart medals in stock.Supporters of the bombings argue waiting for the Japanese to surrender would also have cost lives.At the end of the war, only 52,000 were repatriated to Java." Supporters also point to an order given by the Japanese War Ministry on August 1, 1944, ordering the execution of Allied POWs, "when an uprising of large numbers cannot be suppressed without the use of firearms" or when the POW camp was in the combat zone, in fear that "escapees from the camp may turn into a hostile fighting force".

In 2003, there were still 120,000 of these Purple Heart medals in stock.Supporters of the bombings argue waiting for the Japanese to surrender would also have cost lives.At the end of the war, only 52,000 were repatriated to Java." Supporters also point to an order given by the Japanese War Ministry on August 1, 1944, ordering the execution of Allied POWs, "when an uprising of large numbers cannot be suppressed without the use of firearms" or when the POW camp was in the combat zone, in fear that "escapees from the camp may turn into a hostile fighting force".

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According to the official Navy Department Library website, "The 36-day (Iwo Jima) assault resulted in more than 26,000 American casualties, including 6,800 dead" with 19,217 wounded. military had nearly 500,000 Purple Heart medals manufactured in anticipation of potential casualties from the planned invasion of Japan.

To put this into context, the 82-day Battle of Okinawa lasted from early April until mid-June 1945 and U. casualties (out of five Army and two Marine divisions) were above 62,000, of which more than 12,000 were killed or missing. To date, all American military casualties of the 60 years following the end of World War II, including the Korean and Vietnam Wars, have not exceeded that number.

A total of 350,000 civilians died in the incendiary raids on 67 Japanese cities.

Because the United States Army Air Forces wanted to use its fission bombs on previously undamaged cities in order to have accurate data on nuclear-caused damage, Kokura, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Niigata were preserved from conventional bombing raids. Intensive conventional bombing would have continued or increased prior to an invasion.

This remains the subject of both scholarly and popular debate. casualties could range from 250,000 to one million combatants.

In 2005, in an overview of historiography about the matter, J. Assistant Secretary of the Navy Ralph Bard, a member of the Interim Committee on atomic matters, stated that while meeting with Truman in the summer of 1945 they discussed the bomb's use in the context of massive combatant and non-combatant casualties from invasion, with Bard raising the possibility of a million Allied combatants being killed.

A primary and continuing focus has been on the role of the bombings in Japan's surrender and the U.

S.'s justification for them based upon the premise that the bombings precipitated the surrender.

Some debaters focus on the presidential decision-making process, and others on whether or not the bombings were the proximate cause of Japanese surrender.

Over the course of time, different arguments have gained and lost support as new evidence has become available and as new studies have been completed.

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